Frisbie Levi;

Frisbie Levi;

professor in Harvard College, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, in 1784. He entered Harvard College in 1798, and during most of the time till his graduation in 1792, he supported himself by labor as a clerk or in teaching. He commenced the study of law, but was compelled to desist by an affection of the eyes, which hindered his progress through life. In 1805 he was made Latin tutor at Harvard, and in 1811 professor of Latin, which post he held until 1817, when he was transferred to the chair of moral philosophy, for which he had peculiar qualifications. His lectures on ethics, government, etc., were considered very able; they were chiefly delivered extempore; but some of them have been published (see below). He died July 9, 1822. He was a contributor to the North American Review, and to other periodicals; and a "Collection of the Writings of Professor Frisbie," edited by Andrews Norton, appeared in 1823, containing portions of his Lectures, as well as of his periodical contributions were, Unitarian Biography, 2:231 sq.; Allibone, Dictionary of Authors, s.v.

 
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