Feriae

Feriae

(holidays), a name given by the ancient Romans to all peculiar seasons of rejoicing, including sacred festivals or days consecrated to any particular god. The feriae were of several classes. Some of the public festivals were regularly observed, and the date of their occurrence was marked in the Fasti (q.v.). Such were termed Feriae Stativae or stated holidays. Other public festivals were held annually, but not on any fixed day, and received the name of Feriae Conceptivae. The most solemn class of holidays were those appointed by the public authorities to be observed in consequence of Some great national emergency or impending public calamity, and received the name of Feriae Imperative. No lawsuits were allowed to be conducted during the public feriae, and the people were strictly enjoined to abstain from work under penalty of a fine. The introduction of Christianity into Rome, and especially its adoption as the religion of the state, led to the abolition of the feriae and the substitution of Christian festivals.

 
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