Ansegis

Ansegis

1. A Benedictine monk, born of noble parents at Lyons, was, together with Eginhard, superintendent of the royal edifices; became in 817 abbot at Luxen, and in 827 at Fontanelles. Charlemagne and Louis the Pious employed him for important embassies. He died in 833. He is the author of that important collection of imperial laws known as Libri III Capitularium, containing a number of decrees issued by Charlemagne and Louis the Pious. The German kings had to take an oath upon this book as containing the laws of the empire. The best edition of it is contained in Pertz, Monumenta Germanie legum, vol. 1, — Acta Sanctorum, saec. 4, 1; D'Achery, spicileg. t. 3.

2. Abbot of St. Michael's (probably at Beauvais); was sent in 870 by Charles the Bald as ambassador to Rome; appointed in 871 archbishop of Sens, and used as a tool by the pope against the clergy. John VIII appointed him in 876 primate of the French Church and vicar-general of the apostolic see, but a synod of Pontion protested against this, and recognised him only as metropolite. He died in 882, and his successors had to abandon the distinction, which the pope had intended to connect forever with the see. — Gfrorer, Kirchengeschichte, vol. 2; Gallia Christiana.

 
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