Andromeda

Andromeda

in Greek mythology. Cepheus, the son of the Ethiopian king Belus, was married to Cassiopeia, who was so proud of her beauty that she maintained her pre-eminence over the Nereids. The latter complained of their case to Neptune. The angry god showed himself above the waves of the sea, overflooded Ethiopia, and sent a frightful monster through the land, who devastated the entire country. The oracle of Jupiter Ammon said that Andromeda, the daughter of Cepheus and of Cassiopeia, who had been tied to a rock as a punishment for the boasting of her mother, must be sacrificed to the frightful monster. Perseus met the maiden and asked her the reason of her imprisonment. In order that Perseus might not think the gods punished her for her own crimes, Andromeda related to him why she was condemned to this torture. Hardly had she finished, when, in the distance, the sea began to foam and the frightful monster came rushing on. The disheartened parents saw the death of their daughter drawing near. Then Perseus asked them if he might have her hand in case he liberated her. This was readily granted, and half the kingdom. The monster drew nearer and nearer. Perseus got up with the winged shoes loaned to him by Mercury, and with the petrifying head which he had taken from the Gorgon Medusa, and, holding this before the monster, changed him into stone. The marriage took place; but the brother of Cepheus, Phineus, to whom Andromeda had been promised, began a bloody siege. Perseus was compelled to sum up all his courage to guard himself against his enemy. At last he brought forth his Medusa head, at the appearance of which Phineus was changed into stone. Perseus thereupon took Andromeda to his own country, and she bore him many sons and daughters. The gods placed the entire family — Cepheus, Perseus, Andromeda, and Cassiopeia — among the stars.

 
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