Anderson, John (2)

Anderson, John (2)

an eloquent Wesleyan minister of England, was born at Gibraltar, Spain, where his father was garrisoned, Jan. 28, 1791. He entered the Methodist Society in 1808, the ministry in 1812; travelled many of the prominent circuits, such as Reading (1819 ), Manchester (1821), London, West (1824), City Road (1827), Leeds (1830 ), Manchester (1833), Leeds, West (1835), and Liverpool, North; and died in Liverpool, after severe suffering, April 11, 1840. Anderson was one of the eminent men of the Methodism of his time, to the principles of which he was most firmly attached. He preferred the charges against Dr. S.Warren in 1834, and his name was prominent in that celebrated case. He was tender and ardent in his friend-' ships, fervent in his piety, and zealously devoted to the duties of his calling. Few men of his time exceeded him in the eloquence and power of his pulpit and platform efforts. A speech he delivered at Leeds in 1830 on the abolition of slavery was pronounced by lord (then Mr.) Brougham as the most eloquent and masterly he had ever heard on that subject. He is the subject of the third sketch in Everett's 2d vol. of Wesleyan Takings. He published a Sermon, on the death of Adam Clarke (Leeds, 1832). See Minutes of British Conference, 1840; Wesleyan Meth. Mag. 1846, p. 417, 521; West, Sketches of Wesleyan Preachers, p. 322-335.

 
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