Agobard

Agobard (AGOBERTUS, AGOBALDUS, or AGUEBAUDUS), archbishop of Lyons, was born in 779, but whether in France or Spain is uncertain. In 813 he was appointed coadjutor of Leidradus, the archbishop of Lyons, who was very far advanced in years; and in 816 the archbishop retired into the monastery of Soissons, having appointed Agobard his successor in the episcopal chair. Agobard was driven from his see by Louis-le-Debonnaire for having taken an active share in deposing him in the assembly of bishops, held at Compiegne in 833. When peace was restored between Louis and his sons, Lothaire and Pepin, Ago, bard recovered his see. He died at Saintonge, June 5th, 840. He was considered a man of much genius, and of no small learning in theological questions. He held liberal views with regard to inspiration. He wrote against the Adoptionists, against Ordeal by duel, and against various superstitions of the time. (See Hundeshagen, De Agobardi vita et scriptis, Giess. 1831.) His works have been preserved to us by a singular accident. Papyrius Massonus, happening to enter the shop of a bookbinder at Lyons, as the latter was on the point of tearing up a MS. which he held in his hands, asked permission to look at it first, which he did, and, soon perceiving its value, he rescued it from its impending destruction, and shortly after published it. The MS. itself is preserved in the Bibliotheque du Roi at Paris. His works were edited Paris, 1606, and again by Baluze (2 vols. 8vo, Paris, 1666), and by Masson (Paris, 1605). They may also be found in Bib. Max. Patr. tom. 14.

 
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