Agapetus I

Agapetus I

pope, son of Gordianus, a priest, by birth a Roman; succeeded John II in the papacy, April 21st (29th, Cave), 535. Theodatus, the king of the Goths in Italy, alarmed at the conquests of Belisarius, obliged Agapetus to proceed to Constantinople to sue for peace from the Emperor Justinian. This the pope was unable to obtain; but he signalized his zeal for religion by refusing to communicate with Anthimus the Eutychian, then patriarch of Constantinople. The emperor endeavored to compel Agapetus to receive him into communion, but he resolutely persisted in his refusal. Induced by this bold conduct to look more closely into the question, Justinian became convinced of the error that had been committed in elevating Anthimus to the patriarchal see, and by his order a council was held at Constantinople in 536, in which Agapetus presided, where Anthimus was deposed, and Mennas elected in his stead, and consecrated by the pope. Agapetus died at Constantinople in that same year, on the 22d day of April, after having held the see eleven months and three weeks, according to the most probable opinion. His body was carried to Rome, and buried in the church of St. Peter, in the Vatican, September 20th, on which day his festival is marked in the Roman Martyrology. Five of his epistles remain, viz., one to Justinian, two to Caesarius, bishop of Aries, and two to Reparatus, bishop of Carthage. The epistle to Anthimus, given together with these in the Collections of Councils, is spurious. He was succeeded by Silverius. — Biog. Univ. vol. 1; Baronius, A.D. 535, 536; Cave, Hist. Lit. ann. 535.

 
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